The Civilian-Veteran Disconnect Continues To Grow

first published on March 31, 2016 by

The Veterans Coming Home project has put together a survey of statistics that shows the less civilians serve, the larger the disconnect becomes.

Veterans Coming Home, in association with Vox, put together a short, thought provoking video that statistically shows the growth of the disconnect we’ve all been feeling.

If you’re a veteran, at some point in time, you’ve been thanked for your service. Either a random stranger thanked you at a gas station, or a distant cousin randomly sent you a text message on Veteran’s Day. There isn’t anything we can do about the way this simple statement makes us feel.

For some reason, civilians get a warm fuzzy when they tell us “thank you,” and all we really want is to not be in that situation in the first place. We volunteered for service as an individual, for our own individual reasons. Be that a noble cause, a selfish escape from reality, or just wanting to get out and see the world. It doesn’t really matter, for the most part, we don’t want to stand around awkwardly while you pat us on the back to feel good about your day.

This is just a small example of the disconnect. The real problems are laid out perfectly in this video. A combination of fewer people serving, and fewer civilians having a direct connection to a service member, active or retired, is leading us down a slippery road.

More and more organizations are concentrating on the negative aspects of being a veteran. They’re shining a light on the dysfunctional individuals who cannot operate in the absence of orders. In return, those individuals are being allowed to paint the new face of the American veteran.

 
Is there an answer to this disconnect? Can we find solvency for this new trend?

Personally, I don’t know. With that said however, there is one organization that is trying to answer the question, and fix the problem. If you’re interested in finding out more about who is working on this. Visit Veterans Coming Home >>>here<<< and see what you can do to help.